Bullying in the Workplace: Immature Occurrence, or Symptom of Something Worse?

The noble profession of healthcare; where the work started off from compassion and spirit of alleviating others’ suffering.

It is however, very unfortunate that physicians and nurses are not spared from the issue of bullying. We tend to think that bullying only occurs in schools, and are surprised to hear that it also happens in immature settings.

Bullying is a form of directing the bullies’ dissatisfaction inward or towards each other, themselves, and towards those who are less powerful and influential than themselves.

Examples of bullying in the workplace include being spoken in a belittling manner or being lambasted by the older generation for being weak and spoilt.

Studies show that Asian healthcare workers report the largest quantity of workplace-related bullying. The study was carried out in Singapore, showing abuse by nurse managers and colleagues. It also implies that 70% of the staff choose not to report workplace incidents, suggesting that the number of bullying cases might be even higher.

Bullying cases may not be always obvious. It might not be someone yelling at a poor junior nurse in the OT in front of everyone. Shaming, spreading malicious rumors about a co-worker still is bullying, and so are refraining from promotions or the right to take leave.

Why it happens

As previously mentioned, bullying not only happens at immature settings such as in schools, but also at workplaces all the way up to the higher echelons. A stressful environment, poor working conditions and poor leadership are prime vectors for bullying cases in the workplace.

The perpetrators involved in these cases are usually the ones in power. They exercise their power over helpless individuals, humiliating and belittling them in order to make them feel superior. They are usually authoritative, and oppressive in behavior.

There is also a pattern in the victims of such bullying. Doctors and nurses below the age of 30 reported to be more likely to experience workplace bullying. This is due to their position in the workforce- they are generally the lowest tier amongst everyone else, and are prime candidates to be targeted by perpetrators wanting to flex their authority without much of a pushback.

Another study conducted in Asia showed that nurses with high levels of anxiety were almost five times more likely to experience verbal abuse. Because they are by nature unsure of themselves, they do not have the mental standing to push away from bullies’ abuse. Other personality types that are highly associated with bullying are those who are inexperienced, less assertive with their work, lower confidence, and have vulnerable personalities.

Effects

Decline in productivity and effectiveness of care

The physical and emotional health of the victims decreases, which ultimately leads to worse quality of care for patients.

Victims report headaches, sleeping disorders, and medical errors done, which in turn leads to an increase in absenteeism. An increase in absenteeism due to health issues leads to understaffing of a healthcare institution.

Incur costs

Lower morale from victims results in a higher employee turnover rate. This is costly towards the institution; it is far more expensive to constantly replace employees compared to keeping them and increasing their pay year after year. It just doesn’t make much financial sense.

Higher intetion to quit the job leads to career burnouts whuch are much earlier than normal. Impacting non-workplace relationships as well.

Death

When nurse managers or MOs abuse their co-workers by refusing their right to leave, catastrophic results follow. Malaysian newspaper “The Star” reported in May that concerns have been rising about road accidents among tired and overworked doctors. Not too long ago a houseman in Kota Bharu Hospital hit a cow on the way home and died. Nurul Huda Ahmad, a paediatrician in training, died in a motor vehicle accident after nearly 33 hours on duty.

Ways to Stop It

It is not enough to simply tell the staff to “just stop the bullying.” The superiors of the workplace have to encourage their staff to speak out and report any instances or cases immediately. In addition to promoting a safe environment where employees can do so, employers must train effective communication skills to promote reporting as being viewed as an acceptable and necessary behavior.

Moreover, the training provided must encompass business etiquette that touches upon cultural sensitivity practices, and educate the workforce on negative working behaviors. Sometimes, the bullies may not even know about what they’re doing, until pointed out to them.

In the case of management, policies set in place creates a code of conduct to stop these cases. It is important to enforce it consistently for all staff members. Document any violations. This mitigate behaviors like persistent criticism that has no basis.

The way forwards

The act of bullying in a healthcare settings must not and cannot be left to fester. It creates a lot of damage and losses for both the institution and the people working in them. Most of all, the impact on patient’s safety is hit the hardest.

Patients place their utmost trust in the medical world to help them recover and lead productive lives again. Compromised care can deal potential harm in patients; it can mean the difference between a sound mind and a vegetative state, a living patient or a dead one.

If the medical field is to become the bastion of healing and wellness, then it must address this recalcitrant issue and not let it grow like an unwanted tumor, damaging the whole system in the process.



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	  You get the job right away  
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 Job scams 

 In 2013, a South African registered nurse was approached by a man outside the hospital she worked in. The 25-year old man was a recruitment agent for the  KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of Health . He offered her a job at another institution, for better pay and work hours. 

 The nurse saw this as a great opportunity. She accepted it, and he produced a contract and offered her the job.  Then he requested USD220 in cash for the job.  

 Thankfully, the nurse grew suspicious, and realized she was being scammed. She immediately alerted hospital staff who arrested the man. 

   

 Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened. 

 That could have ended a lot worse. Luckily in that nurse's case, she was able to spot the scam job offer. It is hoped that this post can help you to spot these harmful acts and avoid costing you your precious time, money, and dignity. Scammers know that finding a job can be tough, and they trick people by advertising where real employers do. 

 Scams are endlessly creative! This list might not encompass all of them, but it will help you in detecting these harmful job scams. 

 
 1. See If The Offer Is Too Good To Be True 

 If it seems like you’ve landed yourself the best offer in the world,  DON’T . The hiring managers will say something to you like: 

 
 You can earn as much as you want, there is no upper limit on your salary. You decide what you earn. You can earn USD5,000 in one week by working at home! 
 

 Run away as fast as you can. These scams like to prey on those desperate for a new job. They take advantage of your desperation by having you excited of their offer. Once they’ve gotten you on their hook, those “employers” can start to demand money, information, and time, just to get your application moving. 

  Watch out for:  

 
	 Really high pay with low amount of working hours 
	 Ability to work anywhere, anytime 
	 Really shady phrases, like “ Drive the sports car you’ve ever wanted after only a few months’ work! ” or " Earn USD3000 by only working FOUR HOURS a week! " 
	 The person contacting you is the President or CEO or other executive level staff. Most of the time, the highest-ranking person contacting you for a job offer is some type of manager or human resources employee. 
 

 2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment 

   

 If the hiring manager contacts you again and informs you that you have to pay [insert amount here] to complete your application, forget it. 

 You might see overseas job offers requiring you to pay a few hundred dollars to "process" your application. They'll claim it's to secure your employment. To sweeten the deal, some of them claim that you'll get back the money within days after you get in the company/institution. 

  Here are the most common ways job scams use to cheat your money, like:  

 
	 Buying their software 
	 Paying a fee to complete your application 
	 Sign up for some insurance program that deducts money from your account every month 
 

 Job scammers make all kinds of promises about your chances of employment, and an astounding amount of them require you to pay them for their services to employ you. It's important to note that the promise of a job is  not  the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for that promise, it's most definitely a scam. 

 3. You get the job right away 

 You get the job, without much interviewing, or even applying through anything. The "offer" gets sent to your inbox. They often mention that they got your email from Jobstreet, CareerBuilder, or LinkedIn. 

  Most of the time, these job offers are sent with emails that are similar to emails of legitimate employers. Be careful!  

 
 Imagine if a David Chen from  Ramsay Sime Darby  emailed you about a sweet job offer. If he really worked at RSD, his email would be something like david.c@simedarby.com. Watch out for david.c.simedarby@gmail.com, david.c@gmail.com, david.chen.HR.simedarby@yahoo.com, etc. 

 When in doubt, call up the company and ask for that employee! 
 

  A real company would want to talk to a candidate before hiring him or her.  

 4. Unprofessional job interviews 

   

 Look out for interviews online, such as over  Facebook Messenger . Worse still, are interviews using a software that the scammer asks you to install on you computer. You will risk having your computer infected with harmful malware that can  record what you type  ,  activate your webcam without notifying you , and  hold your personal information as ransom . 

 Look out for interviewers with bad grammar or spelling. If it doesn't seem like what a real professional company would say, don't trust it. 

 
 With some common sense, and a bit of suspicion, you can easily spot scam job offers. The rule of thumb is that if it looks too good to be true, sounds too good to be true, and seems to good to be true, then it's definitely not true. Also look out for shady characters and language. 

 As mentioned above, there is no limit to the creativity of these scam artists and their job offers. The tips mentioned above might cover  ALL  the scam job methods out there, but at least you'll be better prepared, and more aware that these things can happen. 

 As a healthcare-focused job portal site,  MIMS Career  takes the legitimacy of any employer and job posting  very seriously . We screen employers thoroughly, contacting them at various levels, to determine authenticity of said employers. Our  privacy policy  also dictates that we  never  share your personal information to unrelated third parties, nor do we sell them. 

 The next time you're in search of a job, apply through  MIMS Career . Sign up, fill in your details, and apply for job vacancies from top healthcare institutions in  Malaysia ,  Singapore ,  Indonesia , and the  Philippines  with one click. 

 Browse through our extensive database of job postings, updated daily. Our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can save jobs you're interested in on your desktop, and continue reading about it and apply later on your phone. 

 Can't find what you're looking for? Set a job alert, and we'll notify you once a job with your preferences is made available. Sign up now with  MIMS Career . It's fast, convenient, and secure. We do the hard work of verifying scam jobs so you won't have to. 
   

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See if the offer is too good to be true There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment You get the job right away Unprofessional job interviews Job scams In 2013, a South African...

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	  See if the offer is too good to be true  
	  There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment  
	  You get the job right away  
	  Unprofessional job interviews  
 

 Job scams 

 In 2013, a South African registered nurse was approached by a man outside the hospital she worked in. The 25-year old man was a recruitment agent for the  KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of Health . He offered her a job at another institution, for better pay and work hours. 

 The nurse saw this as a great opportunity. She accepted it, and he produced a contract and offered her the job.  Then he requested USD220 in cash for the job.  

 Thankfully, the nurse grew suspicious, and realized she was being scammed. She immediately alerted hospital staff who arrested the man. 

   

 Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened. 

 That could have ended a lot worse. Luckily in that nurse's case, she was able to spot the scam job offer. It is hoped that this post can help you to spot these harmful acts and avoid costing you your precious time, money, and dignity. Scammers know that finding a job can be tough, and they trick people by advertising where real employers do. 

 Scams are endlessly creative! This list might not encompass all of them, but it will help you in detecting these harmful job scams. 

 
 1. See If The Offer Is Too Good To Be True 

   

 If it seems like you’ve landed yourself the best offer in the world,  DON’T . The hiring managers will say something to you like: 

 
 You can earn as much as you want, there is no upper limit on your salary. You decide what you earn. You can earn USD5,000 in one week by working at home! 
 

 Run away as fast as you can. These scams like to prey on those desperate for a new job. They take advantage of your desperation by having you excited of their offer. Once they’ve gotten you on their hook, those “employers” can start to demand money, information, and time, just to get your application moving. 

  Watch out for:  

 
	 Really high pay with low amount of working hours 
	 Ability to work anywhere, anytime 
	 Really shady phrases, like “ Drive the sports car you’ve ever wanted after only a few months’ work! ” or " Earn USD3000 by only working FOUR HOURS a week! " 
	 The person contacting you is the President or CEO or other executive level staff. Most of the time, the highest-ranking person contacting you for a job offer is some type of manager or human resources employee. 
 

 2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment 

   

 If the hiring manager contacts you again and informs you that you have to pay [insert amount here] to complete your application, forget it. 

 You might see overseas job offers requiring you to pay a few hundred dollars to "process" your application. They'll claim it's to secure your employment. To sweeten the deal, some of them claim that you'll get back the money within days after you get in the company/institution. 

  Here are the most common ways job scams use to cheat your money, like:  

 
	 Buying their software 
	 Paying a fee to complete your application 
	 Sign up for some insurance program that deducts money from your account every month 
 

 Job scammers make all kinds of promises about your chances of employment, and an astounding amount of them require you to pay them for their services to employ you. It's important to note that the promise of a job is  not  the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for that promise, it's most definitely a scam. 

 3. You get the job right away 

   

 You get the job, without much interviewing, or even applying through anything. The "offer" gets sent to your inbox. They often mention that they got your email from Jobstreet, CareerBuilder, or LinkedIn. 

  Most of the time, these job offers are sent with emails that are similar to emails of legitimate employers. Be careful!  

 
 Imagine if a David Chen from  Ramsay Sime Darby  emailed you about a sweet job offer. If he really worked at RSD, his email would be something like david.c@simedarby.com. Watch out for david.c.simedarby@gmail.com, david.c@gmail.com, david.chen.HR.simedarby@yahoo.com, etc. 

 When in doubt, call up the company and ask for that employee! 
 

  A real company would want to talk to a candidate before hiring him or her.  

 4. Unprofessional job interviews 

   

 Look out for interviews online, such as over  Facebook Messenger . Worse still, are interviews using a software that the scammer asks you to install on you computer. You will risk having your computer infected with harmful malware that can  record what you type  ,  activate your webcam without notifying you , and  hold your personal information as ransom . 

 Look out for interviewers with bad grammar or spelling. If it doesn't seem like what a real professional company would say, don't trust it. 

 
 With some common sense, and a bit of suspicion, you can easily spot scam job offers. The rule of thumb is that if it looks too good to be true, sounds too good to be true, and seems to good to be true, then it's definitely not true. Also look out for shady characters and language. 

 As mentioned above, there is no limit to the creativity of these scam artists and their job offers. The tips mentioned above might cover  ALL  the scam job methods out there, but at least you'll be better prepared, and more aware that these things can happen. 

 As a healthcare-focused job portal site,  MIMS Career  takes the legitimacy of any employer and job posting  very seriously . We screen employers thoroughly, contacting them at various levels, to determine authenticity of said employers. Our  privacy policy  also dictates that we  never  share your personal information to unrelated third parties, nor do we sell them. 

 The next time you're in search of a job, apply through  MIMS Career . Sign up, fill in your details, and apply for job vacancies from top healthcare institutions in  Malaysia ,  Singapore ,  Indonesia , and the  Philippines  with one click. 

 Browse through our extensive database of job postings, updated daily. Our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can save jobs you're interested in on your desktop, and continue reading about it and apply later on your phone. 

 Can't find what you're looking for? Set a job alert, and we'll notify you once a job with your preferences is made available. Sign up now with  MIMS Career . It's fast, convenient, and secure. We do the hard work of verifying scam jobs so you won't have to. 
   

 Our Most Popular Articles 

  Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization  

  5 Things Nurses Need To Know To Be Paid More  

  10 Ways Malaysian Nurses Can Increase Their Income

How To Spot Job Offer Scams

See if the offer is too good to be true There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment You get the job right away Unprofessional job interviews Job scams In 2013, a South African...

Read More